Reflections on the Year 3 Iceland field trip 2018

By Kathryn Ashton (BSc Geography Year 3)

Over the summer myself and 11 fellow students, along with lecturers James Lea and Rich Chiverrell, spent two weeks in Iceland for our 3rd year field course, conducting fieldwork and getting the chance to see a vast range of the amazing sites and landscapes Iceland has to offer. After managing to make our own way to Iceland, we spent the first night in Reykjavík, spending the evening exploring the colourful city and enjoying some food and drinks in the local restaurants and bars before the trip officially started.

Iceland 2018 fieldclass at Jökulsárlón

Iceland 2018 fieldclass at Jökulsárlón

The next morning we all met with Rich and James at 8am – ready to embark on a 6 hour drive to our first site Skálafell, in the South East of the country, where we spent the first half of the trip. On the way we stopped at many of Iceland’s most famous and incredible sites. These included; Skógafoss, a 60m high waterfall where we all got rather wet walking up to its plunge pool, and Svínafellsjökull – which for many of us was the first time we had seen a glacier in real life and filled us with excitement for the rest of the trip. The drive gave us the opportunity to see the varying landscape Iceland has to offer, with expansive lava fields being a particular highlight. Our final stop was Iceland’s famous iceberg lake – Jökulsárlón, filled with icebergs stretching from the glacier front and out into the sea. Once we arrived at our hostel, we spent the evening cooking group meals, which we continued to do for the rest of the trip. We were also lucky enough to be able to see the northern lights whilst staying here, which we’d all been hoping for during the trip.

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The next two days were spent at Skálafellsjökull and Heinabergsjökull, being introduced to the geomorphology of the area and trying out different fieldwork techniques which we could use when conducting our fieldwork later in the trip. We focused on the moraines within the sandur system to reconstruct past movement and extent of the glaciers, looked at how the landscape may have been shaped and changed by large events such as glacial floods and also at the contemporary processes occurring both within the glacier and at the ice margin, linked to its hydrology. We even managed to take part of an iceberg from the proglacial lake back to enjoy with our drinks at the hostel in the evening. After spending a morning discussing our ideas for our individual projects we split into groups and spent two days conducting pilot studies. Conducting fieldwork in such close proximity to the glaciers was an incredible experience unlike any fieldwork we had done before, and despite the slightly wet weather over these days they are ones which we all thoroughly enjoyed.

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The second half of the trip saw us move to our next site based at Svínafell, on the way we stopped off at another amazing glacier and iceberg lake – Fjallsárlón. Here we spent the day admiring the glacier and icebergs, whilst also looking at the geomorphology of the area and discussing the possible history of the glacier.  We even saw the glacier calving into the lake which was definitely a highlight and a very exciting way to end our day.

For the rest of the trip we were conducting our fieldwork at Virkisjökull-Falljökull. My group focused on the diurnal variations of the hydrology of Falljökull, which gave us the opportunity to work right at the ice margin, measuring the changes within the proglacial stream over 11 hours through the day to understand the dynamics of glacier melt. Another group was based in the moraine system, looking at the primary succession within the area and conducting lichenometry – measuring over 4000 lichens to map the timings of the retreat of the glacier. The final group were based in the outwash plains from previous Jökulhlaup events, measuring lichens and rock hardness, along with boulder sizes, to calibrate the ages of these events and the flow velocities of the floods.

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The drive back to Reykjavík on the final day was equally as good as the drive down. We had the opportunity to walk around the immense Gullfoss waterfall, and had another quick stop at Jökulsárlón. We stopped off at Iceland’s famous geysers which we saw erupt multiple times, whilst also making the mistake of standing down wind of them and getting rather wet. We also saw and drove through the mid Atlantic ridge which was a brilliant way to end the trip.

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Fjallsjökull and ice margin

Our field trip to Iceland provided us with first hand experience working in ice marginal areas of glacial systems and allowed us to fully immerse ourselves into the landscape to understand the many processes constantly changing the environment. Conducting this fieldwork was a fantastic experience and being able to work so closely to these active glaciers was a once in a lifetime opportunity, which we will never forget.

 

My honest experience of university

Blog post by Rosa Blakelock, who graduates next week with a BA (Hons) in Geography

It is often said that university is the best time you’ll have, that you meet your “friends for life” and create memories that the rest of your days will struggle to live up to. These things are often said by those who are looking back, and no doubt some of these things are true, but memory is unreliable and this may not be the whole truth, and may mask parts of university life that re challenging and unhappy, stressful and upsetting memories. The truth is that university can be fun but can also be a very isolated place, which is strange to think, that you can feel lonely whilst surrounded by 25,000-odd people of your own age. When asked to write this blog post as a recently graduated Geography student, I was wary of exhibiting a cynical, Scrooge-like vibe, making readers feel disillusioned, but I am even more wary of contributing to the culture of not talking about issues faced by students, which helps paint a picture of university as clear as dishwater for those who are yet to come. Major organisations such as the NHS (where I now work) have reams of information about student mental health and Student Minds, which is a student mental health charity that provides information for students to look after their health, support others and create change. If you want to find stories written by other students, Imperial has a great blog section on mental health.

I think one of the things that is painfully ironic about university is that when you’re going through a hard time, it is so easy to think you’re alone because everyone around you looks as they’re having a ball. But the reality is that every single person, if not now, then in the not-too-distant past, has been through something very similar. From feeling homesick to feeling too dim to make it through the year, from discretely battling depression and having no energy to get up in the morning, to paranoia and anxiety developing, coming to terms with a newly diagnosed STI…what do all these things share, apart from being astonishingly common among the student population? They are hardly talked about.

Coming back to university after being sectioned in my second year (put in a psychiatric hospital for a few weeks), I felt more alone than ever in my life. I still had my wonderful friends who had stuck by me through the hell I went through, but they were now graduated and I was placed in a brand new year group…like a latecomer to a party where everyone has been hanging out for two years. I am generally a friendly person, easy to get along with you might even say, but man, my confidence plummeted hard during my last year in this new year group. I spent my days sitting on my own in lectures, not talking to anyone, isolating myself from a group of people I was convinced, had it together. Naturally I was given therapy and counselling after my episode and it wasn’t until a few weeks in, sitting in the overcrowded waiting room at the university counselling service that I realised, it’s not just me. The reason waiting lists are so long and appointments are so distant is because so many people apply for counselling that the services just can’t cope. A YouGov survey showed that 27% of British uni students report having a mental health problem whilst studying. And that’s only the people that actually spoke up about having one, I am confident that the percentage would be a lot higher if we were all honest.

Feeling alone is the worst thing in the entire world, and I wouldn’t wish it upon anyone. But, if the fact that I am now graduated, married and in a full-time job bestows me with any wisdom whatsoever, I want to relay that anyone feeling down, anxious, lonely or a combination of the three, is certainly not alone. Your own mental health is more important than anything – good grades, friends, money, popularity, jobs, clothes, drugs, a flat stomach, approval from your parents…anything. So if any of these things are causing you to feel bad, I urge you, make changes, ask for help, take it from someone who’s been through hell and back because of bad choices, it’s just not worth it. Asking for help can be awkward but it is surely not shameful. After I took a year out of university from getting seriously ill, I lost all my confidence, and eventually realised that if I didn’t ask for help, my life would continue to be difficult for the rest of my degree. I sought guidance and advice from my tutor, who I will forever thank as the reason I made it to graduation. She told me that people like me, who have problems that affect their work, sometimes need a bit of extra help to push them forward to the starting blocks everyone else races from. Otherwise I would not only be battling through uni, I would be carrying the weight of my problems too, and no one needs that. If you don’t feel comfortable talking to your friends or even your family, there are so many resources made specially for you! A quick chat with your GP will provide you with some general guidance, and although the university counselling services are stretched, they have drop in sessions and hundreds of leaflets with information that can help. Another good place to visit is the student support department, who have drop-in sessions tailored to give advice and help students out, because they know uni can be a really hard time. One thing that you can’t think is that nothing or no one can help. Initially reaching out for help is the hardest part, I promise. I used to think that getting help was giving me an unfair advantage, but actually, the help is there to give everyone an equal chance.

Anyway, to end on a lighter note, the person you will be when you graduate will be unrecognisable from your former self and for the best possible reasons. University teaches you to look at life pragmatically, develop into a mature version of yourself, and if you’re lucky, you’ll end up making friends that will be the godparents to your children one day.

My Semester Abroad in Calgary

My room mate Mike and myself

My roommate Mike and Myself

Post by Simon Barton, year 2, BA Geography

In September 2017, I embarked on a semester abroad program for four months at the University of Calgary in the beautiful province of Alberta, Canada. After saying my goodbyes to friends and family, I departed from Manchester Airport at 9am on 4th September 2017 on a flight bound for Toronto, before catching a flight from Toronto to Calgary. After 13 hours of travelling, I reached my destination, the Hotel Alma situated on the university campus, this was my temporary base until  I collected the keys for my accommodation.

The Calgary Tower

The Calgary Tower

I collected my keys the next day, entering an apartment of four people. I met my flatmates, which included two international students from China and Japan respectively and a Canadian from Edmonton, a city situated further north than Calgary, which is the capital of Alberta. I familiarised myself with my home for the next four months, before catching the Calgary transit (the public transport system) to explore the city centre. During my orientation week, I took part in activities which included ice skating on the famous Olympic Oval, situated on the university campus, which hosted speed skating at the 1988 Winter Olympics held in Calgary and watching the annual Canadian football kick off match for the Dinos, the team which represents the university in various sports.

Banff

Banff

The rest of September saw me settle into university life by getting to grips with a different academic system and establishing relationships with Canadian students who were from Calgary and other Canadian provinces. A highlight of this month was a day visit to the popular tourist destination of Banff, situated within the Canadian Rockies. The trip was organised by the Global Friendship Group at the University, which aimed to help International Students immerse themselves in all Canada has to offer! The trip involved the unforgettable experience of taking the Banff Gondola (cable car) to the top of Sulphur Mountain to observe the stunning scenery of the area. I met many exchange students from all over the world during the trip, and became good friends during my semester abroad.

Banff view from top of Sulphur Mountain

Banff view from top of Sulphur Mountain

October brought snow! I woke up on the second day of the month to find the university blanketed with a white sheet. I couldn’t contain my excitement, I immediately proceeded to take pictures when walking to class, to the bemusement of onlookers. However, this month also meant midterms. Midterms, being an entirely new concept to me, these are exams taken in October of the first semester, assessing everything you have learned since the start of September. Despite being ill in October, catching flu which seemed to be sweeping its way through my halls of residence and led to my hospitalization on two occasions, I managed to get through the month with the help of the lecturers and Study Abroad Teams in Calgary and Liverpool. October and November certainly seemed to be the months with the highest workload, with midterms, group projects and individual essays.  I didn’t let this stop me managing my academic and social life to allow me  to immerse myself in Canadian culture whether it be watching Hockey on TV on a Saturday night or ice skating with exchange students and University of Calgary students.

Calgary Flames Hockey Match

Calgary Flames Hockey Match

December brought the end of the semester with final exams held just before the Christmas break.  Along with my roommate Mike and friends Tom and Jasper, I watched a live ice hockey match! Taking the transit to Stampede Park, home to the world-famous rodeo and festival known as the Calgary Stampede held every July, we walked to the Saddledome, the home of the Calgary Flames who are one of seven Canadian teams to compete in the National Hockey League (NHL).  Kitted out in my Calgary Flames jersey, a gift from my new friends Tom and Jasper, I cheered on the team in what was a derby match against the Vancouver Canucks.  Despite conceding an early goal, the Flames won the match 4-2 to the roar of the crowd.  Having had a great time in Banff in September, my friends and I decided to visit the area once again.  We drove along the Trans-Canadian highway to the town we had become so familiar with.  After a rest from our long journey, we grabbed a bite to eat and explored the town.  We then proceeded to Lake Louise, the famous lake named after Queen Victoria’s fourth daughter.  The lake was busy with tourists taking pictures, skating and having fun.  It was a fantastic  end to a day I will never forget.

View of Calgary from across the Bow River

View of Calgary from across the Bow River

I certainly wouldn’t hesitate twice to apply for a study abroad program.  I was very fortunate to have an amazing time in Canada.  The experience allowed me to gain an insight into a different academic system, building up new ways of working and learning about issues facing people living in Calgary and Canada.I made friends for life, meeting Canadian students from different backgrounds and exchange students from all over the world.  Although it can at first appear daunting and I was certainly nervous before I went, it is an unmissable experience.  Coming home, you can look back on an incredible past few months!  Grab every opportunity, go on apply for a Semester Abroad, Summer Abroad, Year in China or a Year 2 at XJTLU.

Bio:

Simon Barton is a current second year BA Geography student, he spent his first semester of year 2 at the University of Calgary, Canada.  Simon applied for a semester abroad via the University of Liverpool Study Abroad Team after attending the Study Abroad Fair held on November 2016.

More information on study abroad:

Further details regarding international opportunities available to students can be found online: https://www.liverpool.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/goabroad/.  Use the online Study Abroad search tool to find out the international opportunities available to your programme.   Deadline: 19th February 2018 for Semester Abroad, Year 2 @ XJLTU and Year in China Applications and the 15th March for the Summer programmes

Lorca Field Class 2015

Lorca 2015

Post by Hannah Delohery and Chloe Dawes, Year 2 BSc Geography students

Days 1 and 2:
Days one and two of the six days that we had in sunny Lorca, Spain were our orientation days. They were completed with the purpose of introducing us not only to the area that we would be working in, but also to get our minds (somewhat fresh from the summer holidays) thinking about the key points and processes that we would be examining as part of that work.

Day 1: ‘Castillo de Lorca
After a morning of searching for local bakeries and stockpiling the supermarkets’ supplies of biscuits, bread and water, having bought out Hotel Felix’s bar of Amstel and any other available beers the night previous, day one of Lorca Field Trip 2015 was underway as we made the short journey to the ‘Castillo de Lorca’ via the trusty field trip coach.

As we made the ascent towards the historical site of the 13th century castle; strategically located atop a hill due to its military origins, the history of the area became immediately noticeable in the increasing number of buildings with a more traditional architecture; the arch ways and pillars being highly distinguishable from the very clean cut white walls of the more contemporary builds.

The Castillo, or castle, placement gave our group of avid and definitely not hungover geographers, incredible panoramic views of the valley beneath and the city within, as well as the mountain ranges that encased the two.

The warm but clear conditions that had set in already, that we were to become accustomed to and given t-shirt tans by, made features of the area such as the variable topography, sporadic vegetation and anthropogenic installments easily identifiable. The view and introductory talks given by Janet Hooke, master of the microphone and Andy Morse provided a perfect introduction to the field trip and made it very clear that the damp streets of our lovely Liverpool and of course the equally as damp walls of ‘The Raz’ were far behind, and that we were about to put our first year knowledge to the test as we stepped into second year, in the sun.

Puerto Lumbreras-Nogalte River Channel
Our next instalment of orientation day one took us to an area within the city ‘Puerto Lumbreras’ that had unfortunately fallen victim to multiple serious floods. As we stood within the dry ‘Rambler de Nogalte’ river channel, Janet informed us why two particularly devastating flood events had come to pass, described the effects and impacts upon the local people and showed us the visible examples of flood management that had been introduced since. As unfortunate as the results of the flood events were, visiting this site gave not only an interesting overview of some of the geographical issues of the Lorca area but a reminder of the importance of why geographers do what we do.

Nogalte Channel:
Stops 3 and 4 of day one were both key points of the Nogalte Channel, which has in a relatively short amount of time, experienced some severe changes that made them a must see. The ‘lecture in the field’ talks at these locations elaborated on some of the themes that had been introduced earlier in the morning including channel morphology, hazard management and introduced other key themes such as the concern of climate change and local land use. The first of these two sites also gave us an insight into the research that Prof. Hook has and still is conducting concerning primarily flow rates.

Puentes Dam:
Whether you’re a keen Geographer or not or simply a fan of large-scale construction, Puentes Dam was a site to behold.

The huge dam before us, built in 2000 complete with helipad, represented the CHS’s most recent efforts with damming at Puentes, after developments were first installed at the end of the 18th century. It is in the CHS’s opinion, this most modern dam has indeed saved Lorca from the significant flooding event of 2012 and that without it we might not have had a Lorca to visit today!

Gully:
The final stop of the day may not sound particularly exciting, but for those of you that don’t know, a gully is a major form of soil erosion and land degradation-both topics that physical geographers unashamedly get excited about! This site was a great example of why a considerable amount of research is being performed on gullies at present and for want of a better description, brought the explanation of their development to life in a way no Blackwell’s textbook could.

Buenos Noches:
At the end of the day and after dinner, provided by the wonderfully friendly staff of Hotel Felix, whose service was fantastic throughout and massively contributed to what was a great experience…dedicated research into local past-times and liquor was of course continued by most students.

Day 2:

Day two of orientation was just as insightful and interesting as day one and followed the same format. We visited some truly beautiful places and as a result I’ll take this opportunity to show you, rather than describe it – they do say a picture says a thousand words. (It’s a shame that doesn’t apply to word counts in coursework though eh!)

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Day 3

Waking to temperatures of just under 30 degrees and hearing the rumours of the newly discovered sandwich shop, was a great start to the guided projects day. After travelling to El Muerto, we split into 5 smaller groups. We had 5 demonstrations, each on different topics including; meteorology, slopes and soils, infiltration, vegetation statistics and geomorphology. These mini–experiments provided us with an insight on what factors we might research in our individual reports.

Day 4 – Nogalte & Day 5 – El Muerto

We spent the next two days focusing on our individual projects.

Day 5 - El Muerto Day 4 - Nogalte

Finishing in the field at 4, allowed us to spend a few hours exploring Lorca’s bars and pubs before sitting down for our evening meal at the hotel. With Prosecco on the table at dinner curiosity of the hotel and only a short walk to the Irish bar – O’Neils, the last night was a night to remember (or to forget)!

Day 6 – Departure

Up early, we headed straight to the airport. After rinsing the duty free of what looked to non-students like a year’s supply of Smirnoff, we landed back in rainy Manchester.

Edinburgh Field Class 2015

Post by Dr Paul Williamson

Congratulations to this year’s Edinburgh field class photograph competition winners. Here are the winning entries for the category ‘Views of Edinburgh’:

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And here are the winning entries in the category ‘Students in action’:

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The field class took place in late-April and saw 43 Year 2 BA Geographers and 3 staff heading north, enjoying the warmest and sunniest Edinburgh-based week on record as they to put into practice a variety of research skills acquired over the last year and a half of study.

These included interviewing Members of the Scottish Parliament; surveying any member of the public unable to run away fast enough; interviews with local activists; and participant observation of the local nightlife.

Comparing the 'sense of place' of locals and students

Comparing the ‘sense of place’ of locals and students

This year students researched topics as diverse as perceptions of the newly launched tram network, factors explaining Scottish political allegiance, tourist perceptions of Edinburgh and a comparison of the Liverpool and Edinburgh students’ sense of place.

Tourist perceptions of Edinburgh

Tourist perceptions of Edinburgh

The final part of the field class focussed on data analysis, ranging from traditional graphs and tables of survey results through to the deconstruction of interview responses.

Survey results

Survey results

The Edinburgh Field Class is just part of our wider three-year field class programme, which includes trips to Mid Wales, the Lake District, Spain, California and Singapore. All of these trips are designed an ethos of ‘learning by doing’. Or, in Edinburgh’s Case, ‘learning by doing whilst getting a suntan’. Happy Days!

“Only a Scouser can get the Tube talking” Life after Liverpool and some reflections

danwilberforce

By Dan Wilberforce

BSc Geography (Class of 2013)

So I’m sitting on the London Underground listening to a more-than-slightly-tipsy-Londoner complaining about minicab companies, the pitfalls of the new Hackney Carriage and the reason why he never uses the Tube anyway. It never runs on time, it’s too cramped, the seats smell…”Northern Line this, Northern Line that….”The people of this particular cramped Tube car, on this particular Thursday in January react in the typical London way to the guy’s blusters; awkward shuffles of annoyance, sideways dagger glances and sighs galore…but undoubtedly and perhaps predictably an overwhelmingly apathetic tone triumphs amongst the victims of London’s evening rat-race.

Things weren’t looking like they were going to improve much, when from the corner of the carriage a familiar and welcome accent makes a lively appearance in the form of a small stocky Scouser, resplendent in merchandise from Liverpool FCs official store.

‘Hey mate!’ hollered the Red, catching our evening in-car entertainment’s attention. ‘Shut up will ya, … you’re really doing me nut in. I’m sure we’ve all had a long day and listening to you is seriously down the list of ideal commute options.’

From the eyes wide, slightly panicky astonishment gripping the face of the perpetrator, this sudden outburst of heart-on-sleeve honesty shocked and certainly thwarted any continuation of that specific evening lecture; and the reaction of the crowd was no less brilliant. Visible displays of relief started spreading across the faces of the other car passengers, then that relief turned to joy… and then energy. Soon the carriage was buzzing and people actually started talking to each other. It was great to see, and it all started with a Scouse bloke lightening the mood with a bit of ‘everyone else was thinking it, I just said it’ attitude.

This got me thinking about my time in Liverpool and the energy the city has, the days of Bold Street Coffee, Leaf and Heebies; reasonable rent, ‘8 Days a Week’ all day breakfasts, News from Nowhere, cheap gigs, quad vods, BBQs in the Park, and of course the fact that you knew what you were going to do for at least three years. When you’re in the moment, enjoying (or not) the security of a commitment to something that takes time, it’s easy to overlook the peace of mind that it provides, and consequently not take advantage of that security in a more proactive way. So when Pete North asked me to write a bit about my experiences post Liverpool, and buzzing with nostalgia after the ‘Scouser on the Tube’ episode, I thought I might try and offer some insights and reflections that I and some of my friends have had as a postgrad.

I have recently completed an MSc in Human Rights at the LSE, which is granted a bit more than a hop skip and a jump (subject wise) from the BSc in Geography that I took at Liverpool. Though Geography does have this knack of being very good at providing rounded skill sets. Nonetheless, the masters was challenging; a year of intensive study, meeting people, a new city (that is considerably more expensive than Liverpool), starting to think more in sociological terms than paleoclimatological ones, all whilst trying to find a niche that would suit my new found, slightly abstract collection of qualifications. However, to finish a masters degree and then find myself unable to get anything other than an unpaid internship in any of the related fields was an obstacle that I had not predicted, and actually turned out to be the hardest period of my academic/work related life to date. But it was my fault, and it could have mostly been avoided. See, I was under the impression that I would be able to walk out of the those graduation doors, slam the degrees down on the CV and let the job offers role in, or at least get some interest from something interesting.

I got a linkedIn email from a small recruitment firm in Wandsworth.

I didn’t understand. So I started sending off application after application, CV after CV, cover letter after cover letter….. 20 applications, 30, 40 , 50….

What I became increasingly aware of was the fact that I hadn’t used my time, my exposure to academics, my access to career services or peers as effectively as I might have. Lots of people around me were getting good roles, paid ones, loads of responsibility, challenging positions…what did they have that I didn’t? In reality it was what they had done, as well as what they had. They had spent time developing relationships with various different professionals, as well as people their own age that were interested in roughly similar trajectories. Also something that became apparent was that people had multiple potential routes and aspirations, there was and still is little need to nail one’s flag to the mast so early on, though it does help to work within some relatively refined parameters. This takes me back to the time available to one when studying for a bachelors degree. You have long holidays and plenty of time during term to explore different potential routes for after you graduate. You can use the holidays to do a few short internships, get to know some people in the industries or sectors that interest you, because it is these relationships that open the doors later on. It doesn’t have to take up the whole holiday, just a week or three. Any work put in early on will certainly pay off later on. If finding these connections is a bit daunting, try the professors, try the careers service, the more you put in to finding and developing these early networks…the easier it will be to actually get a fulfilling role. This also applies just as much to any masters level preparation or participation, although I found it harder to find the time during a masters degree.

I am saying this from personal experience and observation… You can work very hard, get a very good degree, but the guy/girl who has made the extra effort to show interest and demonstrate ability to potential employers will be ahead by a decent margin; and it’s very competitive out there right now….don’t be fooled by the zero hour contract revised stats, jobs are hard to find. Also this sort of planning is what you will start doing when starting to work full time. People may start bandying around words like nepotism, brown-nosing and favouritism. But this isn’t what building a network is. Building a network is about finding likeminded people within all age brackets that you can help and that can help you, it is about co-operation and mutual benefit, it is essential in the modern work environment and something you do anyway, though probably in a more social capacity. However, avoid at all costs being way too keen, it just annoys people.

Another thing to try is exploring more people within societies or different social groups at uni. I know most of my extended group of mates focused around groups formed in Halls, but there are so many people around. If you want to find people with big ideas, unless you’re lucky, they probably won’t just appear.

And lastly, do talk to your professors and lecturers. They really do have a tonne of experience in a huge range of areas. I know so many people who went through their entire undergraduate degree (and even masters) without really having a proper chat to the academics at their institution. Don’t do that. You’ll find most of them drink beer, and picking their brains (if they have the time) over a pint is always a good way to find out more about opportunities that interest you.

So all these things, are all undertakings that I’ve been trying to do with more frequency towards the end of my masters and upon completion. I have been interning for various Human rights NGOs, writing some articles for small newspapers, taking testimonies from Darfuri genocide victims, helping to organise attendees for the Holocaust Memorial Day commemorations, attempting to recruit SMEs into custom Corporate Social Responsibility schemes (especially payroll giving), and trying to play a bit of music on the side. I’m also trying to start a social enterprise that provides legal assistance and safe-housing for sex trafficking victims in the UK, but funding seems to be the big next question (guess it’s a watch this space type thing).

I hope that some of these little insights prove helpful for anyone who reads this. I hope it wasn’t too prescriptive, but reading a little chronology about what I’ve been doing might have been a little bland. Liverpool is still without a doubt my favourite city in the UK. I come back as often as I can, and I’m sure that will be the case for years to come. If you’re there, soak up the atmosphere and energy, its good for the soul!

Top Ten Blog Posts of 2014

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As we enter 2015 we look back at the top 10 most viewed blog posts of 2015. These include posts by current and past undergraduate and postgraduate students and staff and give a good idea of some of the things that we do here in Geography at University of Liverpool. We look forward to more posts in 2015 and wish you all a happy new year.

 

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10. In Tenth place, a post from February 2014 by PhD student Madeleine Gustavsson on her first publication: First publication – ‘Procedural and distributive justice in a community-based Marine Protected Area in Zanzibar, Tanzania’

 

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9. In Ninth place, a post from June 2014 by James Wilford who graduated with a BA (Hons) Geography in July this year on the Singapore Field Class 2014

 

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8. In Eighth place, a post from June 2014 by Dr. Paul Williamson on the winners of the Edinburgh Field Class 2014 Photo Competition

 

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7. In Seventh place, a post from May 2014 by Samantha Brannan who graduated with a BSc (Hons) Geography in July this year on Geographers on Tour: Santa Cruz Field Class 2014

 

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6. In sixth place, a post from January 2014 about Lisa Reilly who graduated in July this year about her success as National Student Award Winner

 

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5. In Fifth place, a post from December 2014 by Dr Bethan Evans on a Disability, Arts and Wellbeing Workshop with DaDaFest

 

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4. In Fourth place, a post from October 2014 by Sean Dunn who graduated with a BSc (Hons) Geography in July this year and is now studying for an MSc. His post is about the final year Santa Cruz field class on California Field Class and Travel

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3. In Third place, a post from August 2014 by Alexandra Guy, currently a second year BA Geography student on A Year in the Life of an Undergraduate Geography Student

 

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2. In Second Place, a post from August 2014 by PhD student Natalie Robinson on her research with homeless people in Chicago ‘This is My Story: A Photographic Exploration of Chicago’ – Notes from the field.

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1. And in First place, our most viewed blog of 2014 is a post from February 2014 by Jonny Clark who graduated in July with a BSc (Hons) Geography on How a work-based dissertation re-affirmed my confidence in my subject, my own ability and my future